• "We are fortunate to entrust our instruments to his care"
    - Dr. Tracey Laird, Agnes Scott College Music Chair
    "I highly recommend Haasenritter Piano Service"
    - Geary Brogden, Minister of Music, Ramah Baptist Church
    "My Baldwin piano sounds great, never sounded this good since the day I bought it."
    - Karen Douglassville, GA.

Piano Repair

A piano repair is needed when certain parts within the piano deteriorate, break, come unglued, warp or begin rubbing against other parts.  The most common piano repairs include fixing broken strings, wobbling hammers and sticky keys, as well as diagnosing and eliminating buzzes, squeaks and other extraneous noises.  Often times, broken wooden parts can be repaired on the spot without actually having to wait for replacement parts to come in, such as a broken hammer shank.  In other instances, replacement parts are the only option available, as is the case with disintegrating, plastic elbows from the mid-1900’s.  An extensive piano repair may be necessary when there is structural damage, such as numerous slipping tuning pins, split bridges or a loose lyre.  The nature and severity of the damage determines whether or not the piano repair is performed in the house or needs to be removed to the shop.  When the piano malfunctions badly enough, you will probably suspect that it needs repair.  However, there are times that damage may only be noticed by the critical eye of an experienced piano technician (not a piano tuner).  And, multiple areas of extensive damage may indicate that a piano repair only masks the symptoms of a deteriorating piano.  In this case, the piano either needs to be restored or retired.  

If a note doesn’t perform correctly, does it need a piano repair?

What is the best way to avoid a piano repair?

If a note doesn’t perform correctly, does it need a piano repair?

Just because an individual note is not functioning properly does not always mean that it needs a piano repair.  It could be just the action needs regulation.  The piano action contains over 8000 moving parts and each of its 88 notes has multiple points of very precise adjustment.  Any one of these points, when severely out of its intended range can make a note malfunction.  This in turn can lead to a piano repair.  And, over time, the piano’s mechanism (the action) will gradually go out of adjustment.  Only when it is significantly out of adjustment will you notice it malfunctioning.

What is the Piano Action? (advice coming soon)

What is Regulation?

What is the best way to avoid a piano repair?

There are 3 things that you can do to minimize the chance of a piano repair over the normal life cycle of your piano.  

First, buy a quality piano.  Inexpensive pianos (new grands starting at $5000 and new uprights at $1500) may sound pretty and look great when not compared to a quality piano.  However, there is a reason why they are less expensive than other ones.  Combining the less skilled and cheap labor of emerging countries with the bulk buying power of inferior grade materials and extremely fast processing times in the mass manufacturing process enables the production of  a low-cost piano.  It also means that quality was not high on the priority list.  This translates to a product that often times sounds inferior and will not be as durable over the long-term (and even sometimes in the short-term). 

Second, have your piano regularly serviced by a highly skilled piano technician.  This means routine tuning, as well as periodic regulation and voicing.  Sure it costs more than just having the piano tuned when you hear that it is out.  But, most people want a piano because it looks great and sounds great.  As a result, if you neglect routine maintenance, your piano won’t sound as good as it could (and isn’t that one of the reasons you bought it – for the sound)?

Third, maintain a piano-friendly environment in your house.  The very best thing you can do in relation to this last point is to invest in a humidity control system for your piano (if your house doesn’t have a humidifier and dehumidifier system).  Once again, this costs more initially, but it will keep your piano sounding noticeably better between tunings and will increase the long-term durability of the piano.

Purchase advice

What is Regulation?

What is Voicing?

 What is a “piano friendly” environment?